How to Properly Apply Mascara

Who doesn't want beautiful, long dark lashes that are the envy of the party, work space, or school ? We all know the difference a bit of mascara can make on a day when we aren't feeling so hot, but many of us have no idea how to properly apply the stuff to get movie-star quality lashes that everyone will swoon over. Learning how to apply mascara the right way, can save you money, and time, since high end mascara's work just as well as drug store bought...after all, it's all in how you apply it!

To apply mascara, first coat the entire wand brush; avoid dipping it into your tube over and over because that will form clumps, which will happily stick to your lashes and then you'll have to start all over ! Once your wand is covered, work on the upper lashes first; start at the base of your upper eyelashes, and apply from side to side making sure most eyelashes are coated, and not clumping and sticking together. While you wait for that layer to settle, following the same step for the bottom lashes. Rinse [not literally folks] and repeat a second coat, and you should be good to go! By coating both the upper, and lower lashes you are created a well balanced, dramatic look. If you find that despite your best efforts you have some clumping, simply apply a bit of makeup remover to a cotton ball to remove it.

Some mascara mistakes that we all have made are pumping the wand in and out of the tube; this causes clumps and clumps are a huge pain in the butt. Another common mistake is over-applying. More isn't always best when it comes to mascara, and two light coats should do the trick. The last mistake is using mascara that's too dark for your skin tone; if you're extremely fair, but are using a black as night shade your look is going to be too faux, and too dramatic. Light brown and chocolate reds work better with fair skin!

by Della Upsher

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